Dating violence effects

Dating violence seems to decrease once young adults move beyond being a teenager.

Part of this may be because of the way teenagers see themselves and because of their newness to dating.

A survey of adolescent and college students revealed that date rape accounted for 67% of sexual assaults and 60% of rapes take place in the victim's home or in that of a friend or relative.

The research was supported by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research and the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism.

As teens develop emotionally, they are heavily influenced by their relationship experiences.

The authors found that teen girls and boys reported aggressive experiences in relationships nearly equally, with 30 percent of males and 31 percent of females in the study showing a history of physical and/or psychological dating violence.

"Teens are experiencing their first romantic relationships, so it could be that aggressive relationships are skewing their view of what's normal and healthy and putting them on a trajectory for future victimization," said lead author Deinera Exner-Cortens, M. '10, a doctoral student in the field of human development in the College of Human Ecology.

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In situations of dating violence, one partner tries to exert power and control over the other partner through physical abuse or sexual assault.

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