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As we will discuss below, however, this date is still too early to be compatible with biblical history.

Egyptian monarchs didn’t start building pyramids until the Third Dynasty, conventionally dated around 2686 BC.11 Since the focus of the study was the First Dynasty, the researchers obtained most of their regnal results from the Royal Tombs at Umm el-Qaab, the sacred burial site of Abydos.

Radiocarbon dating of artifacts from Egypt’s Pre-dynastic period and First Dynasty, reported September 4th in the Proceedings of the Royal Society A by Michael Dee and colleagues, suggests Egypt is younger than previously thought.

“The formation of Egypt was unique in the ancient world.

They calculated that 600 to 700 years passed between the development of agriculture in the Nile region and the First Dynasty.14 “The time period is shorter than was previously thought—about 300 or 400 years shorter,” Dee said.

By comparison with the fragmentary records of ancient Egypt, such as inscriptions on the Palermo Stone—containing some of the Royal Annals through the Fifth Dynasty—they estimated the accession dates of the reigns of eight First Dynasty monarchs.

Since then, the average date assigned has been around 3100 BC.2 Dee’s study fits with this trend.

Egypt’s ancient timeline has long been a subject of debate.

Ignoring Egypt’s unifier Menes (aka Narmer, possibly), Aha—the first “official” pharaoh—acceded to the throne, the investigators concluded, around 3100 BC.

This date is more recent than those assigned in traditional timelines of ancient Egypt but pretty much in line with the average dates obtained by more recent secular Egyptologists.

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“We got a whole lot more dates, did the model, and got the computer to work out what this means for when things actually happened,” Dee explained.

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